SRRT Newsletter

Contents

Letter from the Editor
SRRT Coordinator's Column
ALA Annual Conference 2015 Schedule
SRRT Membership Meeting & Celebration of Librarianship
Feminist Task Force News
Hunger, Homelessness & Poverty Task Force News
International Responsibilities Task Force News
Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday Task Force News
Sustainability Round Table (SustainRT) News
ALA Task Force for Equity, Diversity & Inclusion (TF-EDI) News
Book Review: Our Enduring Values Revisited
Call for Editorial Board Members
Call for Submissions
Publication Information

Letter from the Editor

by Melissa I. Cardenas-Dow

Melissa Cardenas-Dow

Greetings SRRT Newsletter readers! With great anticipation, we are looking forward to participating in ALA’s 2015 Annual Conference in San Francisco. SRRT has much in store during the conference including film screenings, programs, and open meetings of our Task Forces and Action Council.

In this quarter’s issue, you will find descriptions of SRRT events, as well as events meant to welcome those who are interested in working with us through partnerships and memberships. Of special note is the book donation drive that is being brought to ALA Annual 2015 through the efforts of Hunger, Homelessness & Poverty Task Force (HHPTF), Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday Task Force, the San Francisco Public Library (SFPL), and many local community organizations.

I look forward to meeting some of our readers, as well as potential and current SRRT members, at some of the these events at ALA Annual 2015!

All the best,
Melissa I. Cardenas-Dow
SRRT Newsletter Editor

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SRRT Coordinator's Column

by Nikki Winslow, SRRT Coordinator, Branch Manager - Spring Valley Library

Nikki Winslow

Looking for a way to get more involved in SRRT? Run for Action Council this coming winter! I was on the SRRT listserv in 2010 when an e-mail went out calling for people to run for Action Council. I honestly had no idea what being on Action Council entailed but thought “Why not give it a try?” I was elected and started serving on Action Council in 2011. I have learned so much about the structure of ALA and its Divisions, Round Tables, and the overall way the association is run. I’ve met so many fascinating people along the way. I think everyone on the SRRT Action Council would agree with me that the group is always looking for new people to get involved to provide a new perspective and passion for the work we do.

SRRT Task Forces are always looking for new enthusiastic members as well. The Feminist Task Force provides feminist perspectives and initiates action on issues related to libraries, librarianship, information services, and ALA. In addition, we have the Hunger, Homelessness and Poverty Task Force, which fosters greater awareness of the dimensions, causes, and ways to end hunger, homelessness and poverty. The International Responsibilities Task Force advocates for socially responsible positions on issues of concern to libraries and librarians that have global reach and impact. We also have the Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday Task Force that supports and advances the observance of the holiday as an American celebration of the work and life of Dr. King. These groups all meet on Friday night at both ALA Annual and Midwinter Conferences, so I encourage anyone who would like to get more involved to stop by and see what each group has to offer. This year, the Task Forces are scheduled to gather at the Hilton San Francisco Union in Yosemite C on Friday, June 26 at 7:30 p.m.

I also wish to highlight the Membership Dinner/Social that we are hosting in coordination with the Progressive Librarians Guild at the Annual Conference at the end of this month. It is being held at the West Portal Branch of the San Francisco Public Library system on Saturday, June 27 at 7:00 p.m. This is another great way to get involved with SRRT and PLG and meet many of the members of these groups. We are also fortunate to have Al Kagan and Tom Twiss there to talk about and sign copies of their books for those in attendance.

In conclusion, I think there are many people who would love to become more involved with ALA in some form. SRRT is one way to do this, with both purpose and impact. The group is very inclusive and informed, offering new members a great way to start participating with like-minded people. If there are any questions I can answer, please don’t hesitate to email me.

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ALA Annual Conference 2015 Schedule

ALA Annual Conference 2015

Friday, June 26, 2015

All Task Force Meeting
6/26/15, 7:30-9:00 p.m.
Hilton San Francisco Union -- Yosemite C

Hunger, Homelessness & Poverty Task Force Meeting (SRRT)
6/26/15, 7:30-9:00 p.m.
Hilton San Francisco Union -- Yosemite C

International Responsibilities Task Force Meeting (SRRT)
6/26/15, 7:30-9:00 p.m.
Hilton San Francisco Union -- Yosemite C

Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday Task Force Meeting (SRRT)
6/26/15, 7:30-9:00 p.m.
Hilton San Francisco Union -- Yosemite C


Saturday, June 27, 2015

Action Council I Meeting (SRRT)
6/27/15, 8:30-11:30 a.m.
Hilton San Francisco Union --Union Square 21

Librarians and Archivists with Palestine Delegation Reportback
6/27/15, 3:00-4:00 p.m.
Moscone Convention Center -- 125 (N)

Now Showing @ ALA: The Great Book Robbery
6/27/15, 4:00-5:30 p.m.
Moscone Convention Center -- 123 (N)

SRRT/PLG Joint Membership Meeting and Social
6/27/15, 7:00-9:00 p.m.
Offsite: San Francisco Public Library, West Portal Branch
190 Lenox Way, San Francisco, CA 94127
Tel: (415) 355-2886


Sunday, June 28, 2015

Now Showing @ ALA: Homestretch
6/28/15, 10:30 am - 12:00 p.m.
Moscone Convention Center -- 123 (N)

No Place to Hide: Whistleblowers Expose the Surveillance State
6/28/15, 1:00-2:00 p.m.
Moscone Convention Center -- 2012 (W)
Glenn Greenwald will be speaking during the program via Skype

Action Council II Meeting (SRRT)
6/28/15, 3:00-4:00 p.m.
Hilton San Francisco Union -- Sutter Room

Progressive Librarians Guild (SRRT-AFL)
6/28/15, 4:30-5:30 p.m.
Hilton San Francisco Union -- Sutter Room

Feminist's Night at the Movies
6/28/15, 8:00-10:00 p.m.
Marriott Marquis San Francisco -- Pacific Suite B


Monday, June 29, 2015

Now Showing @ ALA: CitizenFour
6/29/15, 1:30 am - 3:30 p.m.
Moscone Convention Center -- 123 (N)


Correction, 6/2/2014: Deleted Book Talk with Al Kagan, which has been cancelled. --The Editor

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SRRT Membership Meeting & Celebration of Librarianship

by Elaine Harger, SRRT Member, Librarian at Washington Middle School, Seattle, Washington

Saturday Night with SRRT -- June 27 -- 6:30-10:00 -- San Francisco

Membership meeting! Book Party! PLG 25th Anniversary! All-dietary-needs buffet! Music!

WHO: SRRT members and friends

WHAT: Membership meeting and a celebration of librarianship that is socially responsible, progressive, radical, committed to social/economic/environmental justice.

WHEN: 6:30-10:00 p.m.
6:45-7:30 Appetizers & SRRT General Membership Meeting
7:30-8:00 Book signings with SRRT members Al Kagan and Tom Twiss
8:00-10:00 Eat, drink and be merry -- Celebrate 25 years of SRRT affiliate, Progressive Librarians Guild

WHERE: West Portal Branch Library – SFPL, 190 Lenox Way, San Francisco

DIRECTIONS: Take the K, L or M outbound Muni Metro streetcar from any underground station all along Market street up to Castro Street. Get off at the second stop after Castro, which is West Portal Station. As you exit, turn 90 degrees to the right and the library is directly across Lenox Street, at 190 Lenox Way, where West Portal Avenue meets Ulloa. The door actually faces Ulloa. From the Powell Street station the train takes about 15 minutes or so, and trains usually run every one to ten minutes.

You can use Nextbus.com to find real time departures. The 48 bus also goes from, for instance, Mission and 24th Street to West.

More about the BOOK PARTY -- Get Your Signed Copy!

Progressive Library Organizations: A Worldwide History

Al Kagan, longtime SRRT member and SRRT Councilor, has just published a new book on the history and impact of the seven most important progressive library organizations worldwide—in Austria, Germany, South Africa, Sweden, United Kingdom, and two in the United States -- including the Social Responsibilities Round Table of ALA, and the Progressive Librarians Guild. McFarland will have copies on sale, and Al will be autographing them at SRRT's membership meeting and social Saturday night at SFPL West Portal Branch.

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Feminist Task Force News

by Audrey Robinson-Nkongola, Assistant Professor/Campus Librarian - Western Kentucky University

Please note FTF activities during ALA Annual 2015 in San Francisco:

Monday, 6/26 -- 7:30-9:00 p.m., Feminist Task Force Business Meeting (part of SRRT All Task Force meeting)

Sunday, 6/27 -- 8:00-10:00 p.m., Feminists’ Night at the Movies

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Hunger, Homelessness & Poverty Task Force News

SRRT’s HHPTF has several initiatives for ALA Annual Conference 2015 and we are looking for volunteers and participants! Interested? Please contact Lisa Gieskes at lisagieskes [at] yahoo.com.

The first initiative is the outreach program to bring the Ideas Box to the ALA Conference in San Francisco. Our Task Force is partnering with the California Braille and Talking Book Library, the ALA Office of Literacy and Outreach Services (OLOS), the Rural and Tribal Libraries Group, and Bibliothèques Sans Frontières/Libraries Without Borders to make this happen.

Our second initiative is partnering with the San Francisco Public Library (SFPL) to offer a conference-wide book drive to benefit local homeless shelter libraries. SFPL is the host library for ALA Annual 2015 and SFPL offers model programs highlighted in our Office for Literacy and Outreach Services toolkit. This year’s ALA Diversity and Outreach Fair, to be held from 3 – 5 p.m. on Saturday, June 27 in the Exhibits Special Events Area highlights innovations in library services to people experiencing poverty and homelessness. Additionally, two task forces of the Social Responsibilities Round Table (SRRT) have joined forces with a wide array of member groups and the San Francisco Public Library to coordinate the first-ever ALA book drive that benefits the local community. Book donations will be accepted from June 26-29 in specially-marked bins throughout the conference campus, at the DEMCO booth, and at the Diversity & Outreach Fair. Help us take immediate action to serve people that go without such basics as shelter, food, healthcare, and literacy support in the midst of San Francisco’s striking prosperity by selecting a book from the list and donating it to the book drive.

Conference attendees are encouraged to bring one new book from the list of recommended titles for donation to designated Bay Area organizations providing shelters, support, and transitional housing for youth and families. The goal of the book drive is to collect a range of excellent titles that include books for diverse backgrounds and identities. The donations will be collected in coordination with the San Francisco Public Library to benefit local organizations including Compass Family Shelter, the Providence Foundation of San Francisco, the Berkeley Food and Housing Project, YEAH! (Youth Engagement, Advocacy, and Housing), Homeless Prenatal Program, Westside Community Services, and Home Away from Homelessness.

For more information, and to view the list of suggested donation titles, please visit the Diversity & Outreach Fair page.

Additionally, we will host a “Now Showing @ALA” Film program. HHPTF will partner with the OLOS as well as the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table (GLBTRT) and Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) to feature a new film about homeless youth entitled Homestretch.

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International Responsibilities Task Force News

Focus on Surveillance and Palestine

by Tom Twiss, Liaison Librarian, University of Pittsburgh

The current activities of the International Responsibilities Task Force continue to center on issues of government surveillance and on Palestine.

In the last few years IRTF has devoted much of its effort to resolutions related to government surveillance of citizens. We will return to this topic with two SRRT-sponsored programs at the San Francisco Annual Conference. The first is “No Place to Hide: Whistleblowers Expose the Surveillance State,” Sunday, June 28, 2015, 1:00-2:00 p.m. in room 2012 (W) of the Moscone Convention Center. Internationally-known journalist Glenn Greenwald is scheduled to speak by Skype from his home in Rio de Janeiro about the failure of the mainstream media to actively investigate what the U.S. government is doing, and the need to support whistleblowers vigorously. We should note here that—as when we attempted a similar program last year—there may be some technical problems with presenting this program. We hope and expect that the program will occur as scheduled, and will send out an announcement as soon as we have more information.

In any event, people will have another opportunity to see Glenn Greenwald in a second SRRT program which focuses on surveillance: a showing of the Laura Poitras film CitizenFour in the Now Showing @ ALA series on Monday, June 29, 1:30-3:30 p.m. in 123 (N) Moscone Convention Center. This real life thriller records the historic meetings in Hong Kong in 2013 when whistleblower Edward Snowden shared evidence of the NSA's massive, covert surveillance program with Poitras and Greenwald.

With reference to Palestine, SRRT members will recall that at the 2015 Midwinter Meeting IRTF submitted two resolutions related to Palestine. One called for ALA divestment from three companies especially complicit in the occupation, the other condemned the destruction of libraries and schools in Gaza. Ultimately, SRRT withdrew the divestment resolution from consideration when we learned of complications in the structure of ALA's Endowment Fund. The Gaza resolution was defeated by Council.

Since then, while continuing to investigate options regarding divestment, the IRTF has participated in other activities related to Palestine. In early April, I joined eight other librarians in a delegation sponsored by Librarians and Archivists with Palestine (LAP) which visited Palestinian libraries, bookstores, publishers, research institutes, and related sites. in the West Bank and Israel. Everywhere we heard about the many ways in which these institutions are negatively affected by the occupation and other Israeli policies. A frequent complaint, for example, concerned restrictions on importing literature from “enemy states,” a policy that effectively cuts off Palestinian bookstores and libraries from some of the largest publishers of Arabic language materials. At the same time we learned about some of the remarkable efforts of Palestinian institutions to produce, disseminate, and provide access to publications and information. At the end of our visit, and in consultation with our Palestinian colleagues, we outlined a series of projects designed to help promote both material assistance to Palestinian informational institutions and political solidarity with Palestine. For more information on the delegation, see LAP's 2015 Delegation Report and Solidarity Statement, or attend the SRRT program “Librarians and Archivists with Palestine: Delegation Reportback” at 3:00-4:00 p.m., Saturday, June 27, 2015 in room 125 (N) in the Moscone Convention Center.

An additional SRRT-sponsored event at which attendees can learn about some of the informational challenges confronting Palestinians will be the showing of the film The Great Book Robbery in the series Now Showing @ ALA on Saturday, June 27, 2015, 4:00-5:30 p.m. in room 123 (N) of the Moscone Convention Center. This film, by Israeli-Dutch filmmaker Benny Brunner, tells of the systematic expropriation of 70,000 Palestinian books by Israeli forces in 1948, and of the subsequent incorporation of many of those books in the collections of Israel's National Library. The film will be introduced and discussion will be moderated by Hannah Mermelstein, who has done extensive research on this topic.

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Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday Task Force News

by LaJuan Pringle, Library Manager -- Charlotte Mecklenburg Library

As the Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday Task Force prepares for the 2015 Annual Conference in San Francisco, we are excited about a couple of events that will take place while we are there.

Working in conjunction with the Homelessness, Hunger, and Poverty Task Force (HHPTF), the Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday TF will participate in a book drive to collect books that will benefit several Bay Area community organizations. Donations will be accepted from June 26-29, in specially-marked bins throughout the conference campus, including the street-level lobbies of the North and South buildings at Moscone Center, the Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services table in the ALA Office Area, and the DEMCO booth located at booth #3201. In addition, a special collection will take place at the Diversity and Outreach Fair. We’d love for you to donate a book that will benefit organizations such as: Compass Family Shelter, the Providence Foundation of San Francisco, the Berkeley Food and Housing Project, YEAH! (Youth Engagement, Advocacy, and Housing), and the Homeless Prenatal Program. To help you make plans, a list of suggested titles is available online.

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday TF will also participate in the 2015 Diversity and Outreach Fair, supported by DEMCO. The theme of this year’s fair is Library Services for People Experiencing Poverty and Homelessness. The Task Force’s display will focus on Dr. King’s messages regarding poverty while also promoting the book drive. The Diversity and Outreach Fair will take place on Saturday, June 27, 2015, 3:00-5:00 p.m., Exhibit Hall, Special Events Area, Moscone Center.

Best,
LaJuan Pringle
Coordinator, SRRT, Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Task Force

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Sustainability Round Table (SustainRT) News

Submitted by Rebekkah Smith Aldrich, SustainRT Member-at-Large

SustainRT: Up & Coming
The Sustainability Roundtable was formed to help libraries foster resilient communities. As we wrap up our first year of existence we’re excited to report we’re introducing our very first resolution on the Importance of Sustainable Libraries at the ALA Virtual Membership Meeting on June 4th. The goals of the resolution are to inspire ALA to act as an organization to:

  • Recognize the important and unique role libraries play in wider community conversations about resiliency, climate change, and a sustainable future; and, begin a new era of thinking sustainably in order to consider the economic, environmental and socially equitable viability of choices made on behalf of the association;
  • Enthusiastically encourage activities by the Roundtable itself, its membership, library schools, and state associations to be proactive in their application of sustainable thinking in the areas of their facilities, operations, policy, technology, programming, partnerships and library school curricula; and
  • Direct ALA staff, divisions and round tables to pursue sustainable choices when planning their conferences and meetings, and to actively promote best practices of sustainability through ALA publications, research and educational opportunities to reach our shared goal of vital, visible and viable libraries for the future.

Sound like something you can get behind? We hope so! The resolution was crowdsourced through the SustainRT membership, building off of a successful model resolution passed by the New York Library Association. If you believe in what we’re talking about save the date and join us at the ALA Virtual Membership Meeting, registration is now open: http://bit.ly/1IztI5o

Your Help Needed: The Environmental Scan project team is working to gather a repository of information on books, articles, websites, blogs, social groups, and projects that fall under the umbrella of Sustainable Libraries. Please use this form to suggest resources or projects that will become part of our searchable public database: http://goo.gl/forms/JMP8ua7GT6

Upcoming Opportunities:

Inspired?

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ALA Task Force for Equity, Diversity & Inclusion (TF-EDI) News

by LaJuan Pringle, Library Manager -- Charlotte Mecklenburg Library

The Task Force on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (TF-EDI) has been busy the last six months. We have been working to plan another discussion on equity, diversity, and inclusion during the 2015 Annual Conference in San Francisco. We will brainstorm and discuss ideas and options for promoting equity, diversity, and inclusion for when our association meets in Orlando in 2016 and in the years to come. The program, entitled An Open Conversation with the ALA Task Force on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion: Planning for Orlando and Beyond, will take place on Sunday, June 28, 2015, 2:30 - 4:00 p.m., at the Hilton San Francisco Union, Plaza B. Please join us for this conversation.

Melissa Cardenas-Dow, Alanna Aiko Moore, and Mark A. Puente gave an update of the task force’s work at the REFORMA V conference, which was held in San Diego, in April. The presenters discussed the accomplishments of the task force, to include the first membership survey and our program at ALA Midwinter in Chicago. They also discussed future work which includes a second survey and planning for the Orlando conference in 2016. Presenters reported the presentation went really well with “great energy.” The task force is currently discussing the idea of doing a similar presentation at this year’s National Conference of African American Librarians (NCAAL) conference, which will take place in August in St. Louis.

TF-EDI co-chair, Martin Garnar, will give an update of the task force’s activities at the Virtual Membership meeting that will be held on Thursday, June 4, 1:30-2:30 p.m. (CDT).

Look for a second survey from TF-EDI to go out to membership before San Francisco. Also, the task force will share preliminary results from the first survey as well.

Best,
LaJuan Pringle
SRRT, Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Task Force
SRRT Representative, Task Force on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion

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Book Review: Our Enduring Values Revisited

Gorman, Michael. Chicago: American Library Association, 2015. ISBN-13: 9780838913000. $45.00.

Reviewed by Al Kagan, SRRT Councilor, African Studies Bibliographer and Professor of Library Administration Emeritus - University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign

Our Enduring Values Revisited

Michael Gorman has been prominent in our profession for a long time and was ALA President in 2005-2006. His new book is a sequel to his 2000 book titled Our Enduring Values. He refreshingly cuts through the hype and triviality of much current library literature and refocuses his readers on eight “Enduring Values”: stewardship, service, intellectual freedom, rationalism, literacy and learning, equity of access, privacy, and democracy. He states that “facilitating learning by fruitful and wide-ranging interaction with the human record is crucial and should be understood as the ultimate mission of librarians” (p. 10).

Gorman writes:

“Libraries and librarians took a wrong path in the period between the late 1960s and the late 1980s. The consequences for libraries, library education, and the future of librarianship have been both profound and malign. That wrong path was the embrace of, and domination by, two systems – scientific management and information technology – that are, ultimately, antithetical to the enduring values and mission of libraries. ….There is an alternative to the wrong path, it lies with ... seeing information technology and management as what they are: tools that can, if they are put in their place, be useful in furthering the aims of libraries. They can assume that useful role, but their values should have never been allowed to be the main drivers of librarianship. (p. 15-16)

Of the eight values discussed in the book, Gorman says that only one is unique to our profession: stewardship. Gorman warns us that “digital archives” are unlike past means of preservation. He postulates that an all-digital future could degrade the human record, and he urges us to take our stewardship of digital resources seriously. He notes that these questions are not even raised very often, and are usually dismissed with the assertion that technology and cooperation will solve all problems.

Gorman also laments the rise of “library administrators who know the cost of everything and the value of nothing” (p. 95). He notes that the commercial world actually does value service, and that corporations compete by offering differing services. This is not so in our profession, where services are trimmed on the front lines in order to reduce costs. He especially bemoans the dismantling of cataloging departments.

I found Gorman’s chapter on intellectual freedom unsatisfying. His mainstream treatment leaves out the tension between IF and social responsibility. For example, I wish he had addressed a recent controversy related to these issues, such as the debate around the 2014 ALA panel revisiting the making and showing of the ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom’s 1977 film, The Speaker, which enraged the Black Caucus of ALA and SRRT when it was first released. The Black Caucus argued the film was racist, insensitive and ridden with stereotypes, and that its central focus is “counterfeit and falsely identified as a First Amendment issue.”1

In Gorman’s chapter on equity of access, he remembers early days when many people thought technology would be an integral force for fostering democracy. However, in reality, simple technology has not leveled the playing field as quickly and as effortlessly as many experts had hoped. People with fewer resources often have less access to technology and lower information literacy; libraries have a responsibility to provide equal access and library skills development to all. Taking this proposition seriously, one should ask how emphasis on providing the latest trendy gadgets such as 3D printers impact services to traditionally underserved populations. Gorman states that “It is common for those who implement public policy at all levels to simply install computers and walk away – declaring a victory and going home” (p. 167). Providing access alone does not fix the problems at hand; libraries must also figure out a way of making the access fit and address community needs.

Concerning privacy, the author states that almost every technological advance exacts a “counterbalancing price or detriment” (p. 178). He writes that we allow corporations to profit when we trade convenience for privacy. Gorman also states that libraries are an integral force in fostering democracy, but he seems unable to confront the widespread deep feeling of powerlessness that most feel due to the socioeconomic divide.

In his chapter on “the greater good,” Gorman answers the charge that librarians as a class and our professional associations are “liberal” or “left-wing.” He states that the vast majority of librarians are motivated by a service ethic, including intellectual freedom and civic and political rights, and that such evaluations are indeed correct. “[Libraries] are not businesses with ‘customers’ to be exploited but vital services to members of communities….” (p. 212-213). As a profession, we must break through the perception of most libraries and librarians being politically biased in order to bravely raise our individual voices.

Finally, “Those who say that librarians and library associations should ‘stay out of politics’ are both ignoring the realities of life and diminishing the role that library services play in the human quest for fairness, justice, and decent treatment for all” (p. 216). This is indeed the crux of the matter, and this is why we now need organizations such as SRRT and the Progressive Librarians Guild more than ever.


1. 1978 BCALA Statement on “The Speaker,” Progressive Librarian, no. 42 (Summer 2014): 185.

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Call for Editorial Board Members

Are you looking for a way to be more involved in the Social Responsibilities Round Table? Are you passionate about books, media and their role in social responsibility? Do you have excellent writing and editing skills? Are you good at meeting deadlines and encouraging others to meet them as well? If so, membership to the SRRT Newsletter Editorial Board might be just the volunteer position you’re looking for!

SRRT Newsletter needs to fill two openings on the Editorial Board. Editorial Board memberships are finalized by the SRRT Action Council.

If you are interested in becoming a member of the SRRT Editorial Board, please send a copy of your resume/CV, a brief letter of inquiry outlining your qualifications and interest in the position, and a writing sample and/or examples of previous work to Melissa Cardenas-Dow, SRRT Newsletter Editor, at micd.srrt.newsletter [at] gmail.com.

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Call for Submissions

The SRRT newsletter is always looking for good articles, essays and letters to the editor. The next submission deadline is September 4, 2015.

Submissions to the SRRT Newsletter may be made by any current SRRT Member or SRRT affiliate. Please send your submissions electronically in one of the following formats: MS Word, RTF, PDF, or plain text pasted into the body of an e-mail. Submissions should be 500 to 1,000 words. Graphics are encouraged. If using images that are already on the Internet, the URL of the image and a caption or description may be added to the text of the submission.

Please send original submissions and inquiries to SRRT Newsletter Editor Melissa I. Cardenas-Dow at micd.srrt.newsletter [at] gmail.com, indicating "SRRT Newsletter" within the subject line of your e-mail. A confirmation of receipt will be sent in a timely manner.

Submissions for book or media reviews should be sent to Meaghan Hunt-Wilson, the SRRT Newsletter Reviews Editor at SRRTreviews [at] gmail.com, indicating “Reviews” in the subject line of your e-mail.

Reviews submissions should be sent electronically in MS-Word format or a Word compatible format. Reviewers should keep their reviews to 300-500 words; any length much shorter or longer should be discussed with the reviews editor prior to submission. Reviewers should avoid conflicts of interest. Full disclosure should be made to the reviews editor when appropriate.


Special Call for Submissions: on ALA Offices for Literacy and Outreach Services (OLOS) and Diversity (OFD)

There has been a considerable amount of discussion within and without SRRT concerning the merger of the ALA Offices for Literacy and Outreach Services (OLOS) and for Diversity (OFD). Many feel that the Offices have different missions and fear the merger may weaken one or both. In addition, the reasons for the merger are not fully understood.

The SRRT Newsletter would welcome pieces on the merger, its implications, some historical retrospectives outlining the mission and goals of each office, for our September issue. Please let us know if you are willing to write such an article. Submission guidelines stated above apply.

Melissa Cardenas-Dow
SRRT Newsletter Editor

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Publication Information

SRRT Newsletter is published quarterly by the Social Responsibilities Round Table of the American Library Association. ISSN: 0749-1670. Copyright © 2015 by the Social Responsibilities Round Table. No part of this periodical may be reproduced without permission.

Editor: Melissa I. Cardenas-Dow, micd.srrt.newsletter [at] gmail.com.

Reviews Editor: Meaghan Hunt-Wilson, SRRTreviews [at] gmail.com,

Editorial Board Members: Erik Sean Estep, Michael Gorman, Rebecca Martin, and Julie Winkelstein.

Views expressed in this newsletter are not necessarily those of ALA/SRRT. The editors reserve the right to edit submitted material as necessary or as whimsy strikes.

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